Painting

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Planning

Choosing a color

ColorSwatch.jpg

Your local hardware store and painting store should have hundreds of colors for you to choose from and is a great place to start. They can even alter colors if you would like it adjusted to your taste.

Take plenty of sample color cards[purelocal.com/paintsamplecard] from the hardware store. It is a good idea to select two or three of any shade, as the lighting at the store may create a very different hue as the light in your home. Color also reacts to the time of day, so see how it looks in the morning, noon ,and evening.

The small sample card is usually not adequate to give you the realistic impression. Try painting a three-by-three foot piece of plain cardboard or wood with two coats of the paint. You can purchase just a small sampler[sampleaday.com], rather than a gallon of something that was absolutely wrong. Move it around in the room you intend to renovate and see how the color looks on a large surface. Having a few inches of color as opposed to a whole wall is very different.

Many paints are labeled as one coat only. That is mostly not true. In order to achieve a smooth, pleasing look, two coats are needed.

What types of paint to use

Latex-based Paint Water based paints are usually the most popular choice for do-it-yourself and professional painters. Latex based painted have greatly improved in their performance over the years while still maintaining their forgiving nature. In other words, you can mess up. then clean it up or cover it up very easily. A wet rag will get rid of latex paint whether it's on carpet or hardwood floor. Latex based paint is also VERY easy to work with compared to oil based paint. It will not drip nearly as much and dries ten times faster.

Latex paint can be used ANYWHERE in or out of your house.

Latex paints come in a few different sheen's: Eggshell, Flat, Gloss, and Semi-gloss. Where you use the different sheen's is entirely personal, however, it is a very common practice to paint semi-gloss or gloss paint in your bathroom as the gloss makes the paint more water-resistant and much easier to clean.

Oil-based Paint Oil based paints are taking a fall in popularity as latex paints are becoming the top dog. Over the years, latex paints have been the go-to as oil based paints don't offer much more of an advantage anymore. After a few years as a painter and painting hundreds of homes, I used oil based paint twice.

The only area where oil-based paint is used anymore is on trim, fire places, or cabinets. The only advantage it offers is it's shorter term durability and great adhesion. This is why it is good on cabinets and trim. Cabinets and trim are meant to take a bit of a beating and oil paint helps with bumps and scuffs. However, they will need to be repainted every 3 or 4 years to ensure their durability.

Oil based paints also offer a very smooth finish that is very hard to get with latex based paint.

Clean-up is a nightmare with oil-based paint as the only way to remove oil based paint from anything is to douse it in paint thinner and hope for the best. Oil-based paints also take a full 24 hours to completely dry. They also tend to get brittle after a few years and can chip away.


Choosing the right paint sheen
Most paints fall into one of the general categories of flat, satin, eggshell, semi-gloss and gloss.

The flatter a paint the easier it can hide rough surfaces.The glossier a paint the easier it can be cleaned.A glossy paint will highlight every pit, crack, and crater in the surface it covers, making a wall look far worse than it actually is. That is why kitchen and bathrooms normally use semi-gloss paint and ceilings and living rooms usually use flat paint.

How much paint to buy

The first step is to determine how big of an area you are painting in square feet. One gallon of paint covers approximately 250 square feet, or the average size of a bedroom, with one coat. Keep in mind that you will need to apply at least two coats for complete coverage in most cases.

Do I need primer?

It is usually a good idea to pick up at least a quart of primer to cover up any dark marks, coloring on walls from crayons or markers, water stains, etc. as these will show through even multiple coats of paint.

Where to buy paint and supplies

Painting stores such as:

  • Sherwin-Williams
  • Benjamin Moore

Hardware stores such as:

  • Home Depot
  • Lowes

Scheduling

This plans on how much you are painting. Plan on 2-3 hours per room for beginners.

Painting walls

PaintingWall.jpg

Level of difficulty: Moderate
Estimated time taken: 2 hours a room
Tools required:

  • Drop cloth
  • Screw Driver
  • Putty knife
  • Spackle
  • Caulking
  • Painters plastic
  • Pole sander
  • Paint brush
  • Paint roller and pole
  • Paint

Step 1: Masking

  1. If you have an furniture in the room, it would be best to move as much of it out as possible.
  2. Cover the floor with a drop cloth and tape the edges to ensure no drips on your floors
  3. Mask off any trim, molding, door knobs, window frames, door frames, light switches, etc
  4. Cover any furniture left in the room with plastic

Step 2: Prep work

  1. Spackle any holes in the wall
  2. Caulk any gaps between walls and trim or molding
  3. Let spackle and caulking dry then sand any excess away

Step 3: Wipe the walls down

  1. Using a rag, wipe the whole wall down
  2. Get all dust and debris off the wall and ensure it is 100% clean for paint

Step 4: Prime

  1. Not all walls need to be primed
  2. Prime any dark marks on your wall that will not come off with cleaner such as crayon or marker marks
  3. If you have dark walls and you are going to a light color, you may want to prime to avoid painting lost of coats

Step 5: Paint

  1. The first step is to cut in around any edges where your roller might not be able to reach with a paint brush
  2. Start at the ceiling and cut in down about 6 inches all around the room
  3. Cut in all the corners with your brush as well
  4. Cut in around any molding or trim. Anything you will not be able to precisely get with the roller
  5. After you have cut in everything, it's time to pour some paint in your tray and start rolling the walls
  6. Put some paint on your roller and start at the top of the wall and roll down
  7. Move half a rollers length over so half the roller is still on the area you already painted and roll back up
  8. Continue to do this, over lapping each stroke, all the way around of the room
  9. Check every stroke for any drips or build up. This is what will be most obvious when it drys
  10. Do not worry about complete coverage on your first coat as any decent paint job has at least two coats
  11. Let your first coat dry and rinse and repeat until you are satisfied with coverage

Step 6: Touch up

  1. Let the paint completely dry and walk around the room with a small brush touching up any areas you may have missed
  2. If you can, it may be worth it to leave it over night and check the room frequently in different lights as this will make easier to reveal any mistakes you made

Step 6: Clean up

  1. Remove all the tape slowly ensuring it does not peel any paint off
  2. Seal and store your paint properly
  3. Clean all brushes and rollers thoroughly

Removing cigarette smell from walls

Level of difficulty: Moderate
Estimated time taken: 2 hours a room
Tools required:

  • Killz Oil-based Primer
  • Drop cloth
  • Screw Driver
  • Putty knife
  • Spackle
  • Caulking
  • Painters plastic
  • Pole sander
  • Paint brush
  • Paint roller and pole
  • Paint

Step 1: Masking

  1. If you have an furniture in the room, it would be best to move as much of it out as possible.
  2. Cover the floor with a drop cloth and tape the edges to ensure no drips on your floors
  3. Mask off any trim, molding, door knobs, window frames, door frames, light switches, etc
  4. Cover any furniture left in the room with plastic

Step 2: Prep work

  1. Spackle any holes in the wall
  2. Caulk any gaps between walls and trim or molding
  3. Let spackle and caulking dry then sand any excess away

Step 3: Wipe the walls down

  1. Using a rag, wipe the whole wall down
  2. Get all dust and debris off the wall and ensure it is 100% clean for paint


Step 5: Apply primer

  1. The first step is to cut in around any edges where your roller might not be able to reach with a paint brush
  2. Start at the ceiling and cut in down about 6 inches all around the room
  3. Cut in all the corners with your brush as well
  4. Cut in around any molding or trim. Anything you will not be able to precisely get with the roller
  5. After you have cut in everything, it's time to pour some primer in your tray and start rolling the walls
  6. Put some primer on your roller and start at the top of the wall and roll down
  7. Move half a rollers length over so half the roller is still on the area you already primed and roll back up
  8. Continue to do this, over lapping each stroke, all the way around of the room
  9. Check every stroke for any drips or build up. This is what will be most obvious when it drys
  10. Do not worry about complete coverage on your first coat as any decent paint job has at least two coats
  11. Let your first coat dry and rinse and repeat until you are satisfied with coverage

Step 6: Paint

Step 7: Clean up

  1. Remove all the tape slowly ensuring it does not peel any paint off
  2. Seal and store your paint properly
  3. Clean all brushes and rollers thoroughly

Example Video:
















Painting Stairs

Level of difficulty: Moderate
Estimated time taken: 2-3 hours
Tools required:

  • Drop cloth
  • Screw Driver
  • Putty knife
  • Spackle
  • Caulking
  • Painters plastic
  • Sand paper
  • Paint brush
  • Paint roller and pole
  • Floor paint

Step 1: Masking

  1. Cover the floor with a drop cloth and tape the edges to ensure no drips on your floors
  2. Mask off any trim, molding, door knobs, window frames, door frames, light switches, etc


Step 2: Prep work

  1. Spackle any holes or dents
  2. Caulk any gaps between walls and trim or molding
  3. Let spackle and caulking dry then sand any excess away

Step 3: Vacuum the stairs

  1. Vacuum the stairs, removing any debris
  2. Using a rag, wipe the stairs down after vacuuming to remove any excess dust
  3. Get all dust and debris off the stairs and ensure they is 100% clean for primer


Step 4: Prime

  1. It's always a good idea to prime stairs just for the extra durability
  2. Start at the top and work your way down so you don't step on any wet paint
  3. Ensure the primer is completely dry before paint

Step 5: Paint

  1. The first step is to cut in around any edges where your roller might not be able to reach with a paint brush
  2. Cut in all the corners with your brush as well
  3. Cut in around any molding or trim. Anything you will not be able to precisely get with the roller
  4. After you have cut in everything, it's time to pour some paint in your tray and start rolling
  5. Continue to do this, over lapping each stroke, all the way down the stairs
  6. Check every stroke for any drips or build up. This is what will be most obvious when it drys
  7. Do not worry about complete coverage on your first coat as any decent paint job has at least two coats
  8. Let your first coat dry and rinse and repeat until you are satisfied with coverage

Step 6: Touch up

  1. Let the paint completely dry and walk up and down the stairs with a small brush touching up any areas you may have missed
  2. If you can, it may be worth it to leave it over night and check the stairs frequently in different lights as this will make easier to reveal any mistakes you made

Step 6: Clean up

  1. Remove all the tape slowly ensuring it does not peel any paint off
  2. Seal and store your paint properly
  3. Clean all brushes and rollers thoroughly

Painting doors

Painting cabinets

Finding good contractors

If you decide to hire out please refer to Finding Good Contractors.